Author: Nate May

diminished seventh chord on keyring
Chords

The Diminished Seventh

At times, this chord is simply a filled-out version of a diminished triad, and frequently serves the same transitional function.

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major seventh on keyring
Chords

The Major Seventh

This chord often has a yearning or breathy quality and shows up in less harmonically-restricted styles of pop, as well as in limited jazz and classical contexts.

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dominant seventh on keyring
Chords

The Dominant Seventh

The most common four-note chord in most contexts, the dominant seventh chord shows up more frequently than either the diminished or the augmented triads.

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suspended chord on keyring
Chords

The Suspended Chord

When played as a “sus2” chord or a “sus 4” chord, it can behave in one of two ways: it can serve its stated purpose by suspending resolution to a more stable chord, or it can connote the open sound of an acoustic guitar.

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augmented triad on keyring
Chords

The Augmented Triad

The augmented triad has the interesting quality of inverting onto itself—that is, if you take the triad in root position, and put the bottom note on the top, you get another augmented triad in root position.

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minor triad on keyring
Chords

The Minor Triad

Minor has a reputation for being “sad” in relation to major’s “happy” mood. But the minor triad also shows up frequently in music of lots of different shades and characters.

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